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Blogs by

Kerry Brown

It’s no secret that the world of work is evolving in ways that make everything we do today obsolete within the next five years. We are currently preparing ourselves for jobs that require yet-to-be-invented technology

By 2020—less than six years from now—millennials will comprise nearly 50 percent of the workforce, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, as the country’s 77 million baby boomers retire at an increasing pace.

I read an article recently titled “At Work, Practice Puts Perfection in Reach,” written by Katie Yessi, who is the principal of a public charter elementary school (and also a co-author of the e-book Practice

Numbers don’t lie. As it turns out, though, they do sometimes tell some very misleading stories. Take the polls leading up to the recent US election. Pundits on the left and right each accused various

As if Hurricane Sandy weren’t enough, the New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman tells us, “We’re in the midst of a perfect storm.” But he wasn’t talking about the weather or climate change or even

Last week, I was scheduled to go to the office for a software demonstration. Now, like a lot of SAP employees, I work mostly from a home office (except when I work from airports, taxis,

Improving user adoption, performance and satisfaction is key to a successful – and sustainable – implementation. Workers want to feel competent and efficient. They want to do a good job and feel good about doing

Transparency.  It’s one of those terms you hear a lot, but have you ever thought about what it really means? It sounds vaguely political, or maybe legal, or possibly even fiscal. Usually, when people talk

Monday’s New York Times featured an article titled, “Google Wants to Join the Party, Not Crash It.” Beginning with an anecdote about using your smartphone to look up the answer to solve a dinnertime debate

Here’s a pre-Masie quiz for you: how is organizational change sometimes like an extended family vacation gone horribly wrong? Picture this. You have a large family of various ages, interests and incomes, some who live