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Author's profile photo Bernice Appiah

Part II | First Impressions and Set-up for Success The Circular Economy & SAP Rural Sourcing Management: Pilot Project in Ghana

Welcome to my part two of my experience so far. In Part 1, I introduced you to SAP RSM and its focus in Ghana. In Part 2, I will now share with you the steps to success and my first impressions working on ground with SAP and Ghana’s initiative to reduce plastic waste in the nation.

As an SAP employee born in Ghana and having worked on sustainability projects, this is an excellent opportunity to combine my SAP background with cross cultural business practices. My first month in Ghana has consisted of many introductions, meetings, and briefings with Rural Sourcing Management key players.

First, I met with members of the local IT partners in Ghana and in Accra (Ghana’s capital) through Ghana’s Minister of Environment, Science, Technology & Innovation (MESTI), which connects plastic collectors to recyclers, tracks plastic and measures social impact in the cities of Accra, Kumasi and Bolgatanga—effectively covering a large geographic portion of Ghana (map below).

The experience of meeting local members, who are passionate about this project and committed to its mission, was valuable in gaining insight into the project overall, and the personal connection will serve me well in the future. These local players have been gracious enough to teach me how they’ve tracked recycling so far and how they were able to gather feedback on the many uses of Rural Sourcing Management, along with next steps and actions.

It was obvious to see the impact that plastics are having to my home country, impacting our oceans, sewage systems, and the health and safety of our citizens. I was amazed to learn how recycled plastics can and are being used in the construction of homes, baskets, t-shirts, among many more items in the market in support of sustainability within the circular economy.

Ghana

Ghana MAP

As a common goal, industry, and government sectors are working to align with rural communities to deliver new sources of income through waste management. One being the Dow project in collaboration with other partners to enable a zero plastic waste community in Sekondi-Takoradi, Ghana incorporating community members and waste pickers to co-create a solution that fits the local context. The overarching goal and project is the Minister of Environment, Science, Technology & Innovation (MESTI) Project. This project seeks to work with both the private and public sectors to scale up the pilot system into a national system, which will include informal business such as local market women and formal sector workers such as company employees.

At the end, the goal is the Minister of Environment, Science, Technology & Innovation (MESTI) Project. This project seeks to work with both the private and public sectors to scale up the pilot system into a national system, which will include informal business such as local market women and formal sector workers such as company employees. As my first month ends, it was one full of knowledge acquisition and facilitating meetings, gathering feedback and requirements for success. I am full of pride in the impact Ghana and SAP is making and thankful to have the opportunity to be a part of this national project. I am looking forward to including you in my journey through regular updates. Medase (Thank You).

You can learn more about SAP Rural Sourcing Management on SAP.com

If you’re interested in learning more about the circular economy, there’s a free class available from OpenSAP.

You can ask more questions on this project and more on the SAP Community with using this Q&A tag link: Ask a Question | SAP Community

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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