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I do what others don’t

The title of the blog refers to the description some employers use in their job adverts. And the first line is about the experience some candidates say they have & mention on their CVs.

  • Setting high expectations isn’t wrong but being unrealistic definitely is.
  • Describing achievements isn’t bad but bragging surely is.

Unrealistic Job Adverts and Responses

Both behaviors exist in today’s work environments, where

  • Employers look for the candidates who can do more than what is usually possible,
  • Candidates explain their work as always perfect and completely flawless.

Justified Expectations and Achievements

Sometimes both parties are right for what they ask or explain;

  • Employers when asking potential employees to be able to do something actually have a requirement which they describe incorrectly,
  • Candidates when explaining their achievements are referring to the work which has different context than their potential employer has.

Aiming high to reach heights

At other time they do it deliberately to get the best / highest possible match to their needs;

  • Employers, knowing that one person can’t perform multiple jobs at a time, sometimes manage to get someone who is willing to do extra, for personal (tough) circumstances,
  • Candidates, knowing they can’t deliver what they are claiming, manage to get positions, taking advantage of a business’s current urgent needs, and learn the job while doing.

Fair Market Rate, Unfair Deal

While negotiating the pricing and other terms, the subject becomes even more bizarre;

  • Employers, while expecting their employees on going extra mile and getting more business, are not willing to pay the fair market rate,
  • Employees, while knowing the market rate of a certain job, are considering employer being unfair for paying such rate.

Standards – hard to achieve

When it comes to performance, both feel their expectations were not met;

  • Employers thinking the candidate is not up to the mark,
  • Employees thinking of the employer not worthy to work for.

Contract Termination, a Solution or is it?

Sometimes breaking the employment relation isn’t an option,

  • Employer may not get the skills any better than the current,
  • Employee may not get better job than the one in hand.

The Middle Ground

The best way, in my opinion, in such situation is

  • For Employer, to guide, develop, and reward employees for what they are expected & should be able to do, and are doing the best,
  • For Employees, to do the given tasks the best way possible to enhance the skillset and accordingly being demanded for their capabilities.

The above scenario applies to almost all professions, including SAP Job Market.

Your Experience / Thoughts?

What is your take on this? Did you notice similar, better, or worse situation?

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1 Comment

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  1. Christian Tapia

    Thanks for yor thoughts! We are hiring some people for our team, so it’s something we will definitely consider in the process.

    We should always stay in the middle ground, so both parts get benefited.

    (1) 

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