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Few words scare the corporate world like the term “disruption.” No matter the language, disruption conjures the fear of dilution, alteration, and disturbance. And as the world becomes increasingly hyperconnected, disruption seems to be an ever-present threat.

Nevertheless, the C-suite is remaining vigilant by embracing the digital economy as the new reality. According to a recent study conducted by the Economist Intelligence Unit, 80% of executives view hyperconnectivity positively – indicating that it presents more opportunities than threats. All the while, they are carefully watching the competitive landscape and anticipating the arrival of overnight digital sensations and the inventiveness of long-time adversaries.

However, this is only one side of the transformational change hyperconnectivity is bringing. Disruption is not just happening on the corporate side of the consumer market – consumers are steadily disrupting everything a business touches.

The secret? Go beyond the competition to find disruptive opportunity

Not that long ago, most businesses followed a one-time transaction model. They would manufacture the product and ship it to the retailer, and consumers would purchase it. However, hyperconnectivity has changed the rules – making this experience a distant memory.

Consumers are more connected to information and no longer interested in listening corporate rhetoric. By drastically changing everything in our lives, the Internet is giving more power to the consumer, putting them in a position to guide the conversation and dictate product and service offerings. From this perspective, it is easy to see that hyperconnectivity and its impact on social behavior are the true disruptors.

Haier Asia, a top-ranking multinational consumer electronics and home appliances company, is one of those few companies that quickly recognized how hyperconnectivity is powering consumer-based disruption. “When you look around, no consumer life business is making money. Why is that? Margins are so slim,” cites Yoshiaki Ito, President and CEO of Haier Asia. “Consumers are far, far faster than manufacturers because they are getting new information on a daily basis. In the meantime, traditional companies produce their products – taking 24 months. So the gap is just widening every second.”

Instead of surrendering to these challenges, Haier decided to disrupt itself and the market it serves. With a two-prong approach to digital transformation, the company created a service-based model to seize the potential of new consumer behaviors and accelerate its product development cycles.

“My strategy for Haier Asia is to double up the digital platform. This is a great opportunity to bring us to the next level by becoming a services provider and gaining a steady stream of new revenue,” says Ito.

How did Haier take advantage of hyperconnectivity to gain the attention of stakeholders and consumers? Watch the video below to find out.

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