2.4. Central Instance installation (sapwinci host – Win Srv 2012 (R2))

Start the installation of the last phase – Central Instance:

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You can see in the following video all the details of the “Parameter Summary” screen:

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Finish with success:

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– New LOD system in SAPMMC console (with ASCS and CI Instances):

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Post-Installation

I will not describe here in detail all the follow-up activities that you need to perform after a heterogeneous system copy, this is not the goal of this document, but you need to read and complete all the steps that are mentioned in the SAP system copy guide and also in the SAP installation guide. Next I’ll describe some tasks that are required to do in a similar scenario:

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– Performing a full installation backup (you can use the Oracle BR*Tools);

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– Install the SAP license;

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– Checking the recommended Oracle database parameters (Check the SAP notes 1431798 (Oracle 11.2.0: Database Parameter Settings); 1171650 (Automated Oracle DB parameter check));

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– Updating Oracle optimizer statistics (Check the SAP note 974781 (Oracle internal maintenance jobs);

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– Delete all entries from the following tables: DBSTATHORA, DBSTAIHORA, DBSTATIORA, DBSTATTORA;

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– Delete the user OPS$<SOURCE_SAPSID>ADM;

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– Update the SAP Kernel and the BR*Tools (DBA* files);

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– Check the RFC´s, Jobs, STMS, etc…

=> Other tips:

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– Check the SAP and Oracle services:

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1. Check if the database is running via sqlplus (select status from v$instance;):

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2. Check in the linux host all the oracle processes:

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3. Check in the windows host all the SAP services:

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– Stop SAP / Oracle database (LOD system)

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1. Stop the SAP system (LOD) in the sapwinci host as <sid>adm:

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2. Stop the Oracle database (LOD) in the saplindb host (using the sqlplus):

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3. Stop the Oracle listener service as ora<sid>:

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– Start SAP / Oracle database (LOD system)

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1. Start the Oracle listener service as ora<sid>:

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2. Start the Oracle database (LOD) in the saplindb host (using the sqlplus):

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3. Start the SAP system (LOD) in the sapwinci host as <sid>adm:

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– Disable Archive log mode (NOARCHIVELOG):

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First of all always make sure that you got a backup plan for your SAP system and in this case you need to set the oracle database to “Archivelog Mode” so you can be able to recover your system. But sometimes you may need to set your oracle database to “Noarchivelog Mode“, for instance when you run the SGEN transaction in your SAP system. In this kind of tasks, I always recommend that you change it because if you don´t do this the database will generate a lot of archive logs and possibly will completely fill up the size of your file system. For this task you need to stop the SAP system and then use the following SQL commands:

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– Disable the Oracle password life time:

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Just a quick reminder about maybe the most common small problem in new 11g installations / upgrades.

When you entering in the Oracle 11g world, remember to do something to the default setting of password life time of 180 days. If you do nothing, your users / schema, the SAP system will cease to work after 180 days, so this is very important. For this you need to run the following sql command:

select profile, limit from dba_profiles where RESOURCE_NAME=’PASSWORD_LIFE_TIME’;

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alter profile default limit PASSWORD_LIFE_TIME unlimited;

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– BR*Tools for Oracle DBA:

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BR*Tools is the program package containing BRSPACE, BRBACKUP, BRARCHIVE, BRRESTORE, BRRECOVER, BRCONNECT, and BRTOOLS.

BRTOOLS is the program that displays the character-based menus from which the other BR programs are called. It works together with BRGUI to generate a graphical user interface.

As ora<sid> run the command “brtools”:

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– DBA Cockpit

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The DBA Cockpit is a platform-independent tool that you can use to monitor and administer your database. It provides a graphical user interface (GUI) for all actions and covers all aspects of handling a database system landscape.

You access the DBA Cockpit by calling transaction DBACOCKPIT:

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