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By 2030, more than 75% of workers will be millennials.  Of course by then, the concept of a digital native will not be so revolutionary.  In the meantime though, companies need to acknowledge new consumer technology realities and the expectations they create in the enterprise.

Your new workers can hardly remember a time that Facebook didn’t exist.  Many had smartphones before driver’s licenses. (Many still don’t seem particularly concerned with driving.) Memorizing phone numbers or paging through a printed telephone directory?  How quaint. Today, we can order almost everything from Amazon.  Google is a verb.  Yet, when trying to perform similar tasks at work, we’re often met with a suboptimal experience.  Gartner calls this the “experience gap.”

“While UX was once dismissed as a nonbusiness issue, the experience gap fuels discord between business users and the IT organization. The experience gap can crop up in political battles of considerable consequence.” (Read the full Gartner report*, “Turning Super Tankers: Getting SAP UX Right,” here.)


Advances in mobile computing and ever-more-pervasive connectivity have fundamentally changed our daily routines.  As technological barriers have fallen in the consumer space, design has become an increasingly important differentiator.  Users have a fundamentally different idea of what technology should be.  Your business can now serve customers around the world at any time of day. Your workers expect to be able to work from almost anywhere on any device with a data connection.  And they expect it to be simple.


Do you have an app for that?

*Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in its research publications, and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings or other designation. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner’s research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

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