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If you’re anything like me – of a certain age and a regular on Facebook – your Timeline has probably recently been filled with pictures of your friends’ children on their first day back at school.  Some of them in uniforms they will hopefully grow into one day, others in trousers which parents are clearly hoping will last one more term, and still others starting university (which really makes me wonder where the time has gone – my brother and sister were so angelic when they were at school).

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September in the United Kingdom is always the time for a new school term, and in many cases a new beginning.  This will be the time when children start a new school or move up a year (my 11 year old niece is particularly excited to be in the top year at her primary school), or older students start to head off to college or university. 

If I remember back to when I was at school, I’m pretty sure we had computers but I’m also pretty sure we weren’t allowed to use them!  We had a selection of BBC B computers – for those outside of the UK who might be interested, you can take a look at the wiki here – but they were kept in a special room that we only walked past on our way to physics or chemistry class. It was the year group below me who were the first to be taught how to program and do anything other than play games on them.  I also recall at university, the closest I got to technology in my learning was using the microfiche machines in the library to research old psychology papers.  I even proudly handed over my final handwritten dissertation that I had worked on for many weeks to a local firm who specialised in typing and binding dissertations.  

Of course, learning has changed massively in the intervening years.  My godson does all his work on a laptop and his sisters research the history of Great Britain on iPads.  Universities now provide huge amounts of information online and many people now can study remotely using advances in learning technology that potentially makes the need to visit a classroom for learning a thing of the past.

So what does this all mean to me?  Well, September and the pictures of all my friends’ children in their new school uniforms makes me realise that there’s never been a better time and opportunity to go ‘back to school’, without ever leaving the comfort of your living room.  SAP has a number of ways you can learn more about our products and solutions utilising some of these great new learning methodologies. 

For example, if you’re looking to learn more about SAP HANA, you might sign up to one of the openSAP courses such as Introduction to SAP HANA. Following that, if you want to develop your skills further, you can sign up to SAP Learning Hub and have access to a huge library of SAP learning content including all the SAP HANA courses.  Once you are registered to SAP Learning Hub, you can not only access all the content but you can also register to a SAP HANA specific learning room; these are spaces moderated by SAP experts and instructors where you can ask questions and gain a deeper understanding of the topic.  Additionally,  you can purchase access to SAP training systems using SAP Live Access, allowing you to practice the skills you are learning.  You can do all of this at your own time and at your own pace and at a fraction of the cost of traditional classroom methods. And of course it’s not just SAP HANA content that’s included, at last count over 5000 course titles were included within SAP Learning Hub

So if you’re looking to go back to school at all in the next few weeks or months, why not have a look to see what SAP Learning Hub can do for you.  You can access the discovery edition for free today – dressing up in a school uniform however is optional.

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