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Author's profile photo Former Member

Webinar on business rules and decisions in BPM

I am giving a webinar for SAP on business rules and decisions in BPM. You can register here and the recordings will be available.The webinar will cover:

  • Decisions and BPM
  • Operational decisions and why they are key
  • How externalizing decisions creates simpler, more agile processes
  • Why business rules are essential to managing decisions
  • Some next steps

There will also be some Q&A.

White PaperThis is one of a series promoting SAP’s new book on BPM, which I am writing a couple of chapters for.

You can also download a white paper I wrote for SAP on this topic – Business Rules and Decisioning for Process Experts.

Enjoy.

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      Author's profile photo Former Member
      Former Member
      Hi James, can't wait to hear your webinar.  One thing I'm curious to hear about is an idea of business decisions versus policies.  Ruks Omar and I talk about this a lot as we think this terminology really subclassifies the kinds of decisions and implementation in rules.  What do you think?
      Author's profile photo Former Member
      Former Member
      Blog Post Author
      Greg
      Policies generally fall into two areas - business policy and IT policy. Business rules can be used to implement IT policies very effectively but that is not the same as using business rules to implement decisions. Business policies, on the other hand, influence decisions and determine many, sometimes all, of the rules to be implemented in a decision service.
      Hope that helps
      JT
      Author's profile photo Former Member
      Former Member
      James, can you illustrate the difference with an example please?
      Author's profile photo Former Member
      Former Member
      Blog Post Author
      Let's see.
      An IT policy might be service policy governing the expected performance of a service or one determining that a process would ignore an optional activity (such as one that determines a suitable cross-sell) when the agreed-upon performance level is at risk.
      A business policy might be that prices and terms offered on a company's website would always be as good or better than those offered on a third party site. This policy might result in multiple rules about prices and terms that were enforced when making decisions like "What is the price for this product for this customer?" and "Is this customer eligible for this discount?".
      Author's profile photo Former Member
      Former Member
      got it - thanks