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ISO 9000 – can be a spring board for BPM?

 

1

I recently read in BPTrends, where in Paul Harmon says:

 

“In short, BPM is doing very well in Europe.

 

Where Americans are more likely to jump on each new thing and rush to get a competitive advantage, Europeans typically

study it a bit longer, consider the methodology required to implement the new thing, develop and standardize a methodology,

and then begin to use the new thing in a more systematic way.

And, ISO 9000 is much more integrated into the practices of European companies than it is in the US.”

 

-BPM in Europe, Paul Harmon, Executive Editor, BPTrends      

 http://www.bptrends.com/

 

2

How ISO 9000 may be considered one of the factors facilitating adoption of BPM?

 

One possibility is that implementation of ISO 9000:2000 would have made companies process oriented, though functionally organized,

functioning in a partly computerized and partly manual work environment.

 

The earlier versions of the Standard promoted

  • – the need for company wide realization that ensuring quality of a product is every one’s responsibility, directly or indirectly;
  • – it enabled a company to achieve ‘consistency’ at their current level and
  • – plan to move further up gradually, focusing on continual improvement.

 

The 2000 version promoted ‘process approach’ and the catch phrase was ‘Take care of the processes and

the processes will take care of the product!’

 

And this approach seems to be relevant to management of any other subject too, in addition to quality management,

be it energy management, environment management, software development.

 

To quote from the Standard:

 

Process approach

 

This International Standard promotes the adoption of a process approach when developing, implementing and improving the effectiveness

of a quality management system, to enhance customer satisfaction by meeting customer requirements.

 

For an organization to function effectively, it has to identify and manage numerous linked activities.

An activity using resources, and managed in order to enable the transformation of inputs into outputs, can be considered as a process.

Often the output of one process directly forms the input to the next.

 

The application of system of processes within an organization, together with the identification and interactions of these processes,

and their management, can be referred to as the “process approach”.

 

An advantage of the process approach is the ongoing control that

it provides over the linkage between the individual processes within the system of processes,

 as well as their combination and interaction.

 

When used within a quality management system, such an approach emphasizes the importance of

•a)       understanding and meeting requirements,

•b)       the need to consider processes in terms of added value,

•c)       obtaining results of process performance and effectiveness, and

•d)       continual improvement of processes based on objective measurement.

                                                               

                                                      –Extracted from ISO 9000:2000 Standard

 

 

The revised version ISO 9000:2008

A visit to the following site would provide greater details as per the revised Standard:

http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/management_standards/iso_9000_iso_14000/iso_9001_2008/concept_and_use_of_the_process_approach_for_management_systems.htm

 

 

Please visit.

 

3

What Helmut Kruppke said in 2006!

 

This reminds me of what Helmut Kruppke, CFO, IDS Scheer mentioned, while responding to a question,

“Where do you see the ‘champions’ of BPM in companies?”

 

Kruppke: “…Each company’s management has to determine

– whether it is oriented toward processes and

– whether responsibility is transferred from line organization to process owners.

– Companies also need a standard that precisely defines how process management takes place….”

 

 

                                                                          – (SAP INFO September 2006)

4

Hence, a suggestion….

It may be inferred from the above that the ISO 9000 standard has potential to promote process approach systematically

and for companies implementing it for its intrinsic value, it would serve as a spring board to move on to BPM.

 

Hence, Paul Harmon’s observation above, it appears to me, needs a thought by BPXs.

 

 

 

Sam Anbazhagan

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4 Comments

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    1. Anbazhagan Sam Venkatesan Post author

      Dear Vijay,

      BPM is said to be an ‘IT-enabled management discipline’. It has very robust ‘Excellence’ related features such as Six Sigma for continual improvements and Balance Score Card for performance review .The aim is agility of the company.

      Implementation of ISO 9000 is a systematic approach for the required process orientation. If the process orientation already prevails in companies, that much early they could be candidates for adoption of BPM.

      Then it may be rightly said ISO 9000 can serve as a precursor to BPM.That  is the the point to ponder.

      Thank you for your corraborating view.

      Sam Anbazhagan

      (0) 
    2. Anbazhagan Sam Venkatesan Post author
      Dear Vijay,

      BPM is said to be an ‘IT-enabled management discipline’.
      It has very robust ‘Excellence’ related features such as Six Sigma for continual improvements
      and Balance Score Card for performance review .The aim is agility of the company.

      Implementation of ISO 9000 is a systematic approach for the required process orientation.
      If the process orientation already prevails in companies, that much early they could be candidates
      for adoption of BPM.

      Then it may be rightly said ISO 9000 can serve as a precursor to BPM.
      That is the point to ponder.

      Thank you for your corroborating view.

      (I reformatted my reply for your convenient reading!)
      Sam Anbazhagan

      (0) 
  1. Anbazhagan Sam Venkatesan Post author
    An interesting piece of writing urging organizations to treat processes as asset!

    To quote from the article:

    “The discipline that is dedicated to treating a process as an asset is called Business Process Management (BPM).

    BPM has been developed out of previous process-centered approaches
    –     (e.g. Business Process Reengineering),
    –     Quality Management and
    –     Process-aware IT solutions (e.g. workflow management).

    It is now a holistic management practice that is built on the view that processes should become first-class citizens and be valued as assets with high impact on the performance and conformance of an organization.

    It comprises strategic alignment, governance, methods, IT, people and culture. It covers process program and process portfolio management, and its project management is
    focused on the entire process lifecycle including process identification, modeling, analysis, improvement, implementation, operations, control and change.

    While I find the diversity of the intellectual challenges related to BPM fascinating, there is no excuse for not engaging in a very pragmatic way towards process improvement in practice. Processes are one of your key assets and deserve to be treated that way.”

    Michael Rosemann
    Professor for Information Systems and Co Leader of the
    Business Process Management Group
    at Queensland University of Technology,
    Brisbane, Australia.
    His email is m.rosemann@qut.edu.au.

    BPXs may like to peruse the full article at the following address!
    http://www.bpm.fit.qut.edu.au/documents/BusinessProcessesTheNeglectedAsset.pdf

    Sam Anbazhagan

    (0) 

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