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Without a network connection, a handheld is dead in the water. Handhelds provide various means of connected to your LAN. Connections can be achieved through bluetooth, wireless ethernet, physical ethernet docker and USB docker. This blog will discuss the steps required to set up a handheld with a physical docker.

 

USB docker

The USB docker provides a network connection the the handheld through a connected PC. We use USB docking stations primarily during development and when troubleshooting remotely. Please note, the procedure detailed below assumes that DHCP is supported on your local network.

 

Required Software:

– Microsoft Active Sync

– IDockIT

 

 Required Hardware:

– Handheld

– PC with network connectivity

– USB docker connected to PC 

 

Installation procedure

– Install Active Sync onto local PC

– Install IDockIT onto handheld and reboot it.

– Launch IDockIT and under the “General” tab, select “Direct” as the USB cradle type.

 

The device will use active sync to retrieve an IP from your network. For more details on active sync, please see Microsoft’s Active Sync Site.

For more information on IDockIT, please see the IDockIt User Guide for more information on IDockIt.

 

Ethernet Docker

Please note, the procedure detailed below assumes that DHCP is supported on your local network. 

Required Software:

– IDockIT

 

Required Hardware:

– Handheld

– Ethernet docker with LAN connection

 

Installation procedure

– Install IDockIT onto handheld and reboot it.

– Launch IDockIT and under the “General” tab, select “Ethernet” as the USB cradle type.

 

 

Symbol Ethernet Docker

We’ve noticed that the Symbol Ethernet docker requires its own IP address.  We used MobileDox provided by Symbol to configure the Ethernet docker.

 

Thats it! The whole thing is pretty straightforward. 

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2 Comments

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  1. Anton Wenzelhuemer
    hi,

    you forgot to mention one assumption to all your procedures described, the handheld is assumed to have windows mobile as OS. of course there are other handhelds out there, but for them your active sync procedure is useless.

    moreover you forgot to mention the usecase leading to the description of your efforts. do you basically want to synchronize your desktop mail programm of a certain vendor (MS) with your handheld application of the same vendor or do you want to connect your device with the internet and use networked applications like browser, location based apps (GPS), and so on…

    This said, I am connecting my Windows Mobile 6 based smartphone with either WLAN or GPRS/UMTS depending on what’s available. Generally this works very well, except that most applications need to be started only after the WLAN connection is available to recognize to use it preferrably.

    My cradle is still in the original box, when I do synchronize I do it with an USB cable.

    my 2 cents,
    anton

    ps: for the networking gurus out there I have question: is it correct to call a device’s connection to a LAN via USB and a host computer ‘ethernet connection’? is 802.11 an ethernet standard or is it ‘just’ a standard describing a wireless realisation of OSI layer 1 acess, whereas ethernet refers to any cable based realisation thereof. 

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    1. Mike Brosseau Post author
      You’re totally right. I’m actually referring to providing a Windows Mobile device network connectivity so that it can sync with the SAP Netweaver Mobile 7.1 DOE. Thanks for the clarification though.
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