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The TechEd mania has already started.


Until the end of the year we are going to be hearing all sorts of great and exciting stuff that is in, is coming soon, will be presented at TechEd.


For the inner geek it is great therapy. 


This is all good but then I saw this post yesterday and thought: ‘What could SAP TechEd do?’ 


I don’t need to tell you there are people starving every day.

I don’t need to tell you there are child soldiers fighting wars.

I don’t need to tell you that just a little contribution could make a massive difference. 


I don’t need to tell you this. 


We are about to go to a conference and spend a small fortune on fees, food, hotels and travel.


What if you took a small portion of what you are going to spend on TechEd and made some contribution to help someone break out of poverty?  We could do it individually or we could all join in and do something together.


We could all sing and dance about how great we are and how we raised a squillion dollars or silently in the middle of the night a charity (or several ) could get a significant contribution appear in their bank account with no idea where it came from with no one telling them how they have to spend it.  


We are a community and we could really make a difference. 

We might even change the world.

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18 Comments

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  1. Oliver Kohl
    Hey Nigel,

    saw your post on your personal blog yesterday and had to think about it. What the people at RailsConf achieved is a great start and a company like SAP and we as the SDN community could take this a step further. My fees won’t be that much this year so count me in.

    Best regards,
      Oliver

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  2. Anton Wenzelhuemer
    Nigel, IMHO this is the most important blog here for quiet some time. I whole heartily support your proposal.

    BTW, wouldn’t it be also a great move to trash the whole t-shirt business here and replace it with a donation system as rewards? Say, Milestone/10 bucks from SDN to those in need?

    I imagine people writing complaints to Craig, asking why they passed a milestone 10 days ago and the transferral of the respctive amount to some relief organisation has not yet been documented. And guess what, I could understand such complaints.

    ‘SDN, the community that cares’. Cheers, anton

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      1. Nigel James Post author
        Thanks for the support on this one everyone. Nice to see that is is getting a little traction. Let’s hope that we can pull something off.
        Cheers,
        Nigel
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  3. Ed Herrmann
    Thanks for this post, Nigel.  I would love to see an option when signing up for TechEd or Sapphire to donate instead of receiving marketing “goodies”.  The donations could still come from the companies that sponsor the laptop bags, t-shirts, etc. Personally, that builds my loyalty to a company way more than their name being stamped on one of my 1000 free laptop bags at home.

    I also LOVE the idea of being able to opt to donate our SDN rewards.  T-shirts  are nice, but doing our part to help the world is life changing.  Count me in 100%!

    Thanks again!
    Cheers,
    ewH

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  4. Marilyn Pratt
    I’m inspired to see folks like  Three little words – ‘Change the world’ speaking up for what each of us as individuals as well as communities can do.  By coincidence I am in Israel presently and by coincidence heard last night a creative idea about what corporations can do for communities.  Attended a symposium on National Policy for High Tech in the presence of President Elect, Shimon Peres and Pulitzer Prize author David Vise spoke of how real educational advances could be made if WIFI was freely available to an entire country, for all populations and all economic strata (in Israel, for example).  Such democratic access could be sponsored by corporations (putting companies on equal footing as far as responsibility lies) and greatly enhance the ability of populations to close the “digital divide”.  But more importantly (for me as an individual), the minister of education Yuli Tami also discussed the way each of us, as professionals, could give time to our communities in helping educate our kids and sharing our professional knowledge.  I know that as soon as I return home, I’ll find a way to implement this in NYC on a very personal basis.  This grandma believes that each of us has a responsibility to make these changes.  Thank you Nigel for bringing this to our collective attention!
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  5. Mehtab Qureshi
    The impact of 2005 earth quake in Pakistan was visible and hence registered to the nation and the world. However, the full impact of the devastation caused by the 2010 floods of Pakistan is yet to manifest itself. According to estimation 1/5th of the country is under water. Crops are no more. We do not know the correct death toll. We have no valid data. There is a looming threat of epidemics and malnutrition. This threat is just not restricted to the directly afflicted flood victims. It would probably seep through the civil society , lets say by october – december 2010, When it is estimated that the flood water would recede

    Millions of homes in thousands of villages and towns have been destroyed.  According to  reports, over 20 Million people have been affected by this disaster – more than the 2004 Indonesia Tsunami, 2005 Pakistan Earthquake, and 2010 Haiti Earthquake combined and destruction is increasing each day.

    Infrastructure such as dams, power stations, roads, bridges, schools, agriculture wells, and drinking water hand pumps have been severely damaged or destroyed.
    .

    Over the course of July and early August 2010, Pakistan experienced the worst monsoon-related floods in living memory.  Heavy rainfall, flash floods and riverine floods have devastated large parts of Pakistan since the arrival of seasonal monsoon rains on 22 July.  Assessments of losses and damages are ongoing, but estimates place the number of affected people at more than 14 million.  Over 1,200 people have died, and at least 288,000 homes have been damaged or destroyed.

    The devastating flood in Pakistan had destroyed more than half of the economy of the country.The country which was already facing several other crises including terrorism,poverty,corruption,illiteracy   has now hit by another challenge in the form of flood.At this crucial time ,the world has pledge to help Pakistan in any form .

    U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon arrived in Pakistan on Sunday August 16 2010   to boost relief efforts as concerns grew about the 20 million people made homeless in one of the worst disasters to hit the country.

    Authorities said more flood surges were coursing down the River Indus and other waterways in southern Sindh province and were expected to peak later Sunday, causing fresh deluges. The river, which in better times irrigates the crops of millions of farmers, is 15 miles (25 kilometers) wide at some points — 25 times wider than during normal monsoon seasons.

    This is a humanitarian crisis, and one should really not consider the nationality of the families dieing due to such a crisis. It is so unfortunate that people are considering nationalities when giving aid to individuals including little children. I think this is an opportunity for people, regardless of race, religion or color, to unite.

    SWO is working with the technical support of Pakistan Medical Association in effected areas of Sindh from the first day with its team of Doctors, Technicians, Nurses, Health Visitors and Caregivers. We have organized our Camps in Thatta, Shikarpur and Khairpur Districts, it’s a challenge,  we need help, we urgently need following items:

    1.     Mosquito nets.
    2.     Snake Bite Injections.
    3.     Food stuff.
    4.     Tents.
    5.     Drinking Water.
    6.     US Dollars  70000

    We are now excepting Donations for this nobal cause, Your one dollar can make difference.

    Mehtab Qureshi
    President,
    Saharo Welfare Organization (Regd)
    http://www.saharo-pk.com

    “I will never forget the destruction and suffering I have witnessed today. In the past I have witnessed many natural disasters around the world, but nothing like this.” – U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

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