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I was sent a link to this article on SOA by a friend and I think it brings 2 things in to focus for SAP customer :-  1) Doing SOA on your “own” is going to be a very hard job and a big benefit of being an SAP customer is that SAP is creating the services, SAP is providing the infrastructure (no vendor finger pointing) and SAP is providing example SOA applications. All of this will help to a) reduce costs and b) provide a ready made framework to govern within  2) If we give organisations all this flexibility and agility someone needs to be in place to make sure that it gets used in the “right” way.   This is where I see a key role for the Business Process Expert. This is the person who understands what the heck the Enterprise Architect is talking about, can help the business to put their ideas into some logical form and talk to the techies about making it happen.  It is no longer acceptable in a SOA world to either hide in techie land or take the “business” high ground….without both you really are just wasting your time and money.
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  1. David Halitsky
    Owen –

    I could not agree with you more that success in the ES(O)A world requires even more “controls” than success in the pre-ES(O)A world.

    Unfortunately, there were never enough controls in the pre-ES(O)A world, so asking customers to abide by even more controls in the ES(O)A world is like asking them to go from  anything less than 4.6c to ERP 2005 in one jump.

    How can SAP help ameliorate this problem?

    Well, Solution Manager is one big step forward, but at present, it’s granularity is insufficient.  It doesn’t get down to the real nitty-gritty details than make the difference between a successful and unsuccessful implementation.

    But apart from creating a sufficiently detailed Solution Manager which incorporates a real “diachronic metadata repository” of the type I’ve been describing in my current blog, SAP has to figure out a way to solve a political problem which is very difficult:

    How to get 3rd party systems integrators and implementors to “do the right thing” by SAP and SAP customers

    When I worked in Huntsville AL I was out drinking with a bunch of PM/VP types one night and one of them enunciated his basic contracting strategy: “Never get Phase 1 working until you have a signed contract for Phase 2.”

    This may be an extreme case, but we are all familiar with integrators and implementors who have very similar philosphies – e.g. why work “smart” on a project with 100 staff when I can work “stupid” and fill 300 “seats” with 300 “butts”? 

    And even the ones who are “honest Joes” often don’t really know how to do what they’re supposed to know how to do.

    So what can SAP do about the corrupt and inept?

    I don’t know – maybe SAP needs to develop an “Implementor/Integrator(I/I)” certification program where I/I’s don’t get certified unless they’re not only willing to learn what SAP thinks they should be doing, but are also willing to go out and do it.

    Alternatively, maybe SAP needs an “honest broker” program, where it certifies “4th-party” firms who have the know-how and guts to keep an eye on the corrupt and inept “I/I’s” and report the truth back on their activities back to SAP customers.

    What did Khruschev say way back then? “When shrimps whistle …?”

    (0) 
  2. David Halitsky
    Owen –

    I could not agree with you more that success in the ES(O)A world requires even more “controls” than success in the pre-ES(O)A world.

    Unfortunately, there were never enough controls in the pre-ES(O)A world, so asking customers to abide by even more controls in the ES(O)A world is like asking them to go from  anything less than 4.6c to ERP 2005 in one jump.

    How can SAP help ameliorate this problem?

    Well, Solution Manager is one big step forward, but at present, it’s granularity is insufficient.  It doesn’t get down to the real nitty-gritty details than make the difference between a successful and unsuccessful implementation.

    But apart from creating a sufficiently detailed Solution Manager which incorporates a real “diachronic metadata repository” of the type I’ve been describing in my current blog, SAP has to figure out a way to solve a political problem which is very difficult:

    How to get 3rd party systems integrators and implementors to “do the right thing” by SAP and SAP customers

    When I worked in Huntsville AL I was out drinking with a bunch of PM/VP types one night and one of them enunciated his basic contracting strategy: “Never get Phase 1 working until you have a signed contract for Phase 2.”

    This may be an extreme case, but we are all familiar with integrators and implementors who have very similar philosphies – e.g. why work “smart” on a project with 100 staff when I can work “stupid” and fill 300 “seats” with 300 “butts”? 

    And even the ones who are “honest Joes” often don’t really know how to do what they’re supposed to know how to do.

    So what can SAP do about the corrupt and inept?

    I don’t know – maybe SAP needs to develop an “Implementor/Integrator(I/I)” certification program where I/I’s don’t get certified unless they’re not only willing to learn what SAP thinks they should be doing, but are also willing to go out and do it.

    Alternatively, maybe SAP needs an “honest broker” program, where it certifies “4th-party” firms who have the know-how and guts to keep an eye on the corrupt and inept “I/I’s” and report the truth back on their activities back to SAP customers.

    What did Khruschev say way back then? “When shrimps whistle …?”

    (0) 

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