Skip to Content
Recently Sun certified that SAP had passed all of the more than 5000 tests in the Compatibility Test Suite (CTS) and is one of only three vendors recognized as having a Java EE 5 compatible application server, and the first major applications provider to achieve this significant milestone.  So that our customers and partners can get an early look at the new features and benefits of the Java EE 5 compatible SAP NetWeaver Application Server, we have made a version available for download from SDN, which includes a new version of SAP NetWeaver Developer Studio.  To help get started, you may want to take a look at the What’s In the SAP NetWeaver Application Server Java EE 5 Edition document available on SDN.  This document provides a great overview of the key new features and supported standards the application server, the adminstration tools, and the developers tools.  Give it a try and let us know what you think by posting to one of the application server forum or blogs on SDN.  We’d love to hear your feedback.
To report this post you need to login first.

14 Comments

You must be Logged on to comment or reply to a post.

  1. Nigel James
    Sorry, where is Oracle and Jboss and well everyone else and who is TmaxSoft?

    Well done SAP in continuing to support the latest standards.

    Nigel

    (0) 
    1. Jeff Anders Post author
      While it would be wrong for me to speak on behalf of Oracle, JBoss, or anyone else for that matter, I can only point to Sun’s Java web site (in my original blog) as a reference that only three vendors have passed the CTS to date, SAP being one of them.  Certainly other vendors have announced they will support Java EE 5, and some have even made previews of their application server available, but until they pass the CTS they can not legitimately claim they are Java EE 5 compatible as per the licensing and branding agreement with Sun.

      I’m not familiar with TmaxSoft myself, but they claim to be the leading middleware company in Korea.  I couldn’t tell for sure from their site, but it looks like they just sell middleware, and no applications.

      (0) 
      1. Nigel James
        Absolutley Jeff, wouldn’t expect you to speak on behalf of the others. I am just impressed that SAP is leading the way on this. Good to see.
        (0) 
        1. Jeff Anders Post author
          Thanks for your comments, and your support Nigel.  Of course I would be remiss if I didn’t acknowledge the entire team of people at SAP who work on the application server and helped make this accomplishment possible.

          Regards,

          Jeff

          (0) 
  2. Valery Silaev
    Just read a “What’s new” document about J2EE 5 implementation. It seems that JPA implementation supplied is too limited. So the questions are:

    — Will WebAS/J2EE5 will be updated with new JPA implementation? If “yes”, are there are any estimates?
    — Is JPA implementation pluggable, so one could replace default implementation with custom one, like new Hibernate (full JPA implementation)?

    VS

    (0) 
    1. Jeff Anders Post author
      Hello Valery,

      I did some checking on your question about the JPA implementation.  According to my resources, the JPA implementation provided in the fully compatible application server now available for download is complete as per the current specification for JPA.  Can I ask what specifically you think is missing so I can look into this further?

      (0) 
    2. Adrian Goerler
      Valery,

      our JPA implementation is fully compliant, complete and certified in the sense that it not only fulfills the official Sun CTS test suite but also has been tested with pretty much every JPA example we could find on the web. Admittedly, it has some minor limitations, some missing (optional) features and implementation choices, we considered noteworthy and therefore documented them. This document was considered to relevant only for developers actually working with JPA. Unfortunately, these minor details now appear in a very prominent location in the “What’s New” document and somehow reduce the fact that we offer a fully compliant JPA implementation to a bullet point.

      Nevertheless, if you consider any of the details mentioned in the “What’s New” too limiting, please let us know.

      Kind regards,

      Adrian Görler

      (0) 
      1. Valery Silaev
        Adrian,

        Let us outline what is missing:
        — no ID generators (neither SEQUENCE nor IDENTITY); JDBC 4.0 finally get it, you omit this functionality.
        — no versioning (exists even in pre-JPA versions of O/R java tools)
        — important column annotations are ignored; I’m really get skeptic about your implementation when read that SAP JPA ignores “length” and “nullable”
        — problems with blobs; you mentioned manual adjustments, I fear it’s will be more then this.
        — restricted set of inheritance / relations options. no per class tables? this leads to inefficience in case of small number of  sublcasses but with large variation in attributes; bi-directional one-many link affects application design.

        As far as I know, to pass certification it’s necessary to pass all mandatory tests, but you may skip tests for optional functionality. Also note that any spec (incl. JPA) is only a common denominator, and sometimes it’s necessary to use “best of breed” implementation. Hence my question about pluggability of JPA in SAP WebAS.

        VS

        (0) 
        1. Adrian Goerler
          Valery,

          please allow me to clarify this, misunderstanding:

          The Java EE 5 preview edition is shipped with an IDE which consists of an Eclipse 3.2 + WTP 1.5 + Dali 0.5. The limitations you are listing are limitations of of the ForwardMapper tool which comes with Dali 0.5. Dali 0.5 is an open source eclipse project and no SAP product.

          We evaluated Dali 0.5 and found its functionality to be very limited. Nevertheless, we decided to have Dali 0.5 on the preview DVD/download in order to offer a preview in which direction we are heading in the IDE area. In the IDE, we added a disclaimer to point out the fact that Dali is no SAP product. This disclaimer is missing in the “Whats New” article.

          The fact that the forward mapper tool, which comes with Dali has some limitations should not prevent you to use the the features, this (non-SAP) forward mapper does not support. You just may have to manually post-process the DDL script generated by the forward mapper tool.

          Nevertheless, some limitations you are mentioning remains namely

          – SAP JPA does supports GeneratorType.AUTO and GeneratorType.TABLE but not GeneratorType.SEQUENCE and GeneratorType.IDENTITY. (You may consider this to be a bug.)

          – SAP JPA does not support InheritanceType.SINGLE_TABLE and InheritanceType.JOINED but not InheritanceType.TABLE_PER_CLASS. (Actually  InheritanceType.TABLE_PER_CLASS is an optional feature of JPA. Also, with InheritanceType.JOINED you can get very far ” in case of small number of sublcasses but with large variation in attributes”, from my point of view).

          Please be assure that SAP JPA passes “all mandatory tests”. It does.

          Regarding plugability: SAP JPA is integrated into the application server using the standard technique – the PersistenceProvider interface. In therory, it should be possible to plug other persistence providers as well. However, I do not know wether this has been tested yet. Please feel free to try it out and share your experience with us! (Also, you might want to try to plug SAP JPA into the Java EE 5 engine of your choice).

          I am sorry that the “Whats New” article lead to so much confusion.

          Thank you for your feedback,

          Adrian Görler

          (0) 
          1. Jeff Anders Post author
            Hello Adrian,

            Thank you for this excellent explanation of our JPA support.  I just wanted to clarify one item in your last post.  You mentioned that “SAP JPA does not support InheritanceType.SINGLE_TABLE and InheritanceType.JOINED”.  Did you mean to say that it DOES support these?

            Regards,

            Jeff

            (0) 
          2. Valery Silaev
            Adrian,

            Thank you for detailed explanation.

            From document it was not obvious that these limitations are associated with IDE tool rather then with run-time library. I guess it should be stated explicitly and even emphasized. Now your JPA implementation looks solid enough for me 🙂

            Well, JOINED and TABLE_PER_CLASS inheritance types are in fact interchangable. The difference is in performance for certain application specific use-cases. It’s just my feeling of “safety” when you know that all possible options are at your disposal 😉

            VS

            (0) 
  3. Harald Mueller
    Hi Jeff,
    you mentioned that SAP had passed all of the more than 5,000 tests in the Compatibility Test Suite (CTS). This is of course not wrong but actually the Java EE Compatibility Test Suite has more than 27,000 tests. I will give some SDN points to the one which guesses the correct number. Of course our colleagues from dev. are excluded from that game 🙂
    (0) 

Leave a Reply