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Hello everyone. We are again presenting an exciting conference with even more interesting and useful sessions than before, especially in the Process Integration (or Exchange Infrastructure) area. Of course, this is a totally biased opinion. I am sure the other tracks and sessions are just as exciting and informative 😉

Introduction

The EPI350 hands-on session is going to lead you step-by-step on how to develop a J2EE adapter user-module. You will be able to use the steps given in the workshop on your own system when you go back. In addition, the code we used in class can easily be modified to accommodate your own need.

As we get more sophisticated in using XI, we start to contemplate all kinds of possibilities how we can process even more interesting interfaces. Some of these interfaces, at first glance, may appear to be impossible. But, with the help of user-modules, we will now have a gleam in our eyes which will say “humm…I think I can…”.

Adapter user-module introduces capabilities to process messages which seemingly would not be possible. An example is using PGP to read an encrypt message, or to produce an encrypted message for your business partner.

We will also be using the Partner Connectivity Kit (PCK) during this workshop. PCK is a very powerful tool which can be use to test our user-modules without an XI system. Since PCK only requires a J2EE engine, therefore, small enough to be installed on our laptop, we can develop our user-module while travelling, e.g. on an airplane. Yes, your company will love this. You will now be working during all your waking hours, without having to be connected.

Workshop Detail

At the end of this workshop, you will:

  1. Understand the architecture of SAP XI Adapter Framework
  2. Use the NetWeaver Developer Studio to develop and deploy the adapter module
  3. Use PCK to test the adapter module
  4. Understand the requirement and steps during the development process
  5. Configure the adapter module in the adapter communication channel
  6. Monitor the adapter module processing in the RWB

To save time, we have pre-configured the PCK and the test interface to test the user-module. But, we have included these configurations in the handouts so that you can duplicate them on your own systems.

I hope see you all there.

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6 Comments

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  1. Michal Krawczyk
    will this be a “bring your own box session”?
    (will we be installing PCK on our laptops?) 🙂

    BTW
    some nice tips and trickes will be included ? 🙂
    or more or less standard adapter module dev ?

    Regards,
    michal

    (0) 
    1. William Li Post author
      I suppose we would all like to have enough time to go through the PCK installation also.  Unfortunately this is only a 2-hour session, barely enough to just go thru the hands-on exercise.

      The laptops provided in the classrooms will already have PCK installed on them.

      Best Regards,
      Bill

      (0) 
      1. William Li Post author
        Well, this is a little difficult to answer.  The workshop will go thru what we consider as the most streamlined and error-free way of developing user module.  It minimizes manual construction of XML-configuration files, by using the tools in the NW Dev Studio.

        The session is primarily for someone who wanted to but has yet developed an user module, or someone who had “experimented” or tested the development, possibly based on many of the excellent weblogs and how-to guides on SDN.  It will bore those who would consider themselves as seasoned developers who already had user modules in productive use.

        Regards,
        Bill

        (0) 
      2. William Li Post author
        Well, this is a little difficult to answer.  The workshop will go thru what we consider as the most streamlined and error-free way of developing user module.  It minimizes manual construction of XML-configuration files, by using the tools in the NW Dev Studio.

        The session is primarily for someone who wanted to but has yet developed an user module, or someone who had “experimented” or tested the development, possibly based on many of the excellent weblogs and how-to guides on SDN.  It will bore those who would consider themselves as seasoned developers who already had user modules in productive use.

        Regards,
        Bill

        (0) 

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