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h5. Introduction    Occasionally, one comes across an intgration scenario for which XI’s standard adapters do not suffice. Creating a new JCA adapter is always an option, but it is often overkill for dealing with relatively simple communication requirements. Furthermore, an adapter module is usually inappropriate for handling actual communications. This blog illustrates an approach which uses a Java Proxy to handle the communications instead.   I won’t explain proxy development per se in this blog, since it has been described at some length in other blogs and in the XI documentation:   ** [Using Acknowledgments with XI 3.0 Java Proxies | https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/pub/wlg/3531 [original link is broken] [original link is broken] [original link is broken] [original link is broken] [original link is broken] [original link is broken]] **   ** [An Illustration of Java Server Proxy | An Illustration of Java Server Proxy] **   ** [Asynchronous Inbound Java Proxy | Asynchronous Inbound Java Proxy.] **   ** [SAP Library | http://help.sap.com/saphelp_nw04/helpdata/en/44/79973cc73af456e10000000a114084/frameset.htm] **     h5. Example    As an example case, consider the HTTP adapter. One thing it is (unfortunately) incapable of doing is transfering dynamic message content to the URL query string.   Say, for example, we are requesting a list of search hits from Google  (http://www.google.com). The search string can be submitted as part of the URL query string, e.g. http://www.google.com/search?q=XI  (http://www.google.com/search?q=XI) (which searches for “XI”). Now let’s say the search string is part of the request message: image
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  1. Michal Krawczyk
    hi,

    >>>>Chiefly, a single proxy can only handle a single specific Message Interface.

    in one of our clients we’ve designed
    a configurable java proxy

    for a new interface all you need to do
    is generate a java proxy and more or less
    add it’s name to the configuration WWW
    and the new message is handled like that

    but of course it’s true that in standard
    it can only handle one (unless this one
    is a wapper for many other which could
    also be the case) 🙂

    Regards,
    michal

    (0) 
    1. Thorsten Nordholm Søbirk Post author
      Hi Michal,

      Interesting…. I did comtemplate the possibility of creating a kind of generic proxy to handle multiple message interfaces – just didn’t have the immediate need for it. I’d be very interested in your approach if you wish to share it.

      Kind regards,
      Thorsten

      (0) 
    1. Thorsten Nordholm Søbirk Post author
      Hi Amol,

      I tried to search for similar blogs, but I guess I missed yours – sorry about that. I’ll try to do i wider search in the future.

      BTW, I like the idea of using the Jakarta HTTPClient instead of just standard Java. It makes it significantly easier to deal with the more complicated aspects of HTTP conversations.

      Regards,
      Thorsten

      (0) 
      1. Amol Joshi
        hey Thorsten,

        The intention was not to point out rather I was very happy to see somebody who thinks on the similar lines as that of mine..:)

        Happy blogging!!
        Rgds,
        Amol

        (0) 

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