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SAP Web Application Server Overview


The SAP Web Application Server is the reliable, open standard-based application server from SAP. It supports both
J2EE and ABAP, and serves as the underlying infrastructure for all new and upcoming SAP solutions, like SAP R/3 Enterprise, SAP Portal, SAP Exchange Infrastructure,
and all other SAP components. The SAP Web Application Server is not a new product; it is the natural evolution of proven SAP application server technology formerly known as SAP Basis. It provides the platform to develop, execute, and operate Web applications and Web services as well as traditional SAP GUI based applications. The SAP WAS is the application platform of the SAP NetWeaver, which is the basis for the other NW components

SAP WAS provides a complete development infrastructure on
which you can develop, distribute, and execute platform-independent, robust, and scalable Web services and business applications. SAP Web Application Server supports ABAP, Java, and Web services.

With the SAP WAS you can implement both server-based and
client-based Web applications. Server applications (for example, online shops or portals) can be created in the integrated development environment or in an external tool. These applications can contain Web pages as well as static HTML code and dynamic script code.


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ABAP

The SAP Web Application Server provides a complete development and runtime environment for ABAP-based applications. It is optimized for the development of highly scalable business applications.

The ABAP development environment is used both for developing completely new applications and extending and modifying SAP standard applications for customers. The entire, powerful infrastructure of the Web AS can be used, which even supports the creation of the most complex applications by large groups of developers.

The ABAP technology can be used to implement complete
applications including user interfaces. However, it is also possible to implement only the core components of an application, such as the business logic and persistence in ABAP and to use defined interfaces (RFC, BAPIs, Web
Services and so on) so that a Java-based interface can be used, or to make other applications available.

JAVA

The J2EE Engine is an integral component of the SAP Web
Application Server and implements the J2EE standard. This J2EE standard has been defined by the Java Community according to the rules of the Java Community Process and is copyright protected by Sun Microsystems. Since November 2002 SAP has been a member of the Executive Committee of the Java Community.

In addition to the pure J2EE standard technologies, the J2EE Engine implements complementary technologies that provide extensions to the standard and are targeted at supporting large-scale, real-business application
development projects.


Evolution of Server Technology</a>



 

Application Server < 6.10


 

User Access

    • SAP GUI
    • Web Browser and Mobile Devices via SAP ITS

User Interface Programming

    1. Dynpro

Programming Language

    1. ABAP

Connectivity

    1. Access to 3rd party infrastructure via connectors and gateways


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Web Application Server 6.10


 

User Access

    1. SAP GUI
    2. Web Browser and Mobile Devices


User Interface Programming

    1. Dynpro
    2. BSP (Business Server Pages

Programming Language

    1. ABAP

Connectivity

    1. RFC
    2. HTTP(S)
    3. SMTP
    4. SOAP/XML


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Web Application Server 6.20


 

User Access

    1. SAP GUI
    2. Web Browser and Mobile Devices

User Interface Programming

    1. Dynpro

    2. BSP (Business Server Pages)
    3. JSP (Java Server Pages)

Programming Language

    1. ABAP
    2. Java

Connectivity

    1. RFC
    2. HTTP(S)
    3. SMTP
    4. SOAP/XML


image


 

Web Application Server 6.40


 

User Access

    1. SAP GUI

    2. Web Browser and Mobile Devices

User Interface Programming

    1. Dynpro
    2. Web Dynpro
    3. BSP (Business Server Pages)
    4. JSP (Java Server Pages)

Programming Language

    1. ABAP
    2. Java

Connectivity

    1. RFC
    2. HTTP(S)
    3. SMTP
    4. SOAP/XML


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</p>
  </td>
</tr>
</table>


Architectural Differences between J2EE Engine 6.20 and 6.40


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The J2EE Engine 6.40 cluster consists of one or more Java instances, the Central Services instance and a central database. Additionally, each Java instance consists of one dispatcher (that dispatches client requests to the server processes) and one or more server processes (that handle client requests).


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Persistency

DBMS service used as a persistent storage. It is
distributed.

External central DB used, which is accessed via the
ConfigurationManager of the engine

Web Services

All beans are exposed as Web services

You have to create a Web service from a bean explicitly
using the SAP NetWeaver Developer Studio.

Data Storage

Cluster configuration data is stored locally in the file
system. Application data is handled by the state controller.

Cluster configuration data and application data is stored in a central database. If you need to update your applications after you have initially deployed them, you need to redeploy or update them using the Deploy Service. Manual editing of files on the file system is not possible.

J2EE Specification

Supports J2EE 1.2 specification

Supports J2EE 1.3(which is compatible with 1.2) and a
preparation for 1.4 specification

Communication Schema

With J2EE Engine 6.20 there were no Central Services, and each cluster element communicated with all other cluster elements. With a large number of cluster elements, system performance was significantly lower.


image

SAP has changed the architecture for 6.40 and the performance is much better now.


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Starting and Stopping Cluster Nodes

Since PL19 of the J2EE Engine 6.20, the Java startup and control framework is available as an option for starting and stopping J2EE Engine 6.20 cluster nodes. However, it requires manual installation and configuration.

The Java startup and control framework is installed
together with the J2EE Engine. Java instances are started and stopped only by the Java startup and control framework.

Please see continue in SAP Web Application Server Evolution and Comparison – Part 2

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8 Comments

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  1. Gregor Wolf
    Hello Oleg,

    this Weblog gives a real nice overview. But can you check your formating? I think you added another html and body tag and so the normal SDN Header looks rearly wired.

    Regards
    Gregor

    (0) 
  2. Former Member
    Hey oleg,

       Can you create a link out of that architecture diagram on WAS and show a bigger picture of the architecture? It will help ppl
    understand the architecture better

    subra

    (0) 
  3. Former Member
    Hi,

    Thanks for this overview.

    You note that the Web AS 6.40 is compatible with J2EE 1.3(which is compatible with 1.2) and has a preparation for 1.4 specification.

    Is there a more detailed compatibility matrix?
    What about Web Services and JAX-RPC specification compatibility?

    Thanks,
    Caroline

    (0) 

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