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All independent nodes are always singleton(you can’t change their singleton property to false). All context nodes and attributes that have the root node as their parent are said to be independent. This is the reason why I used a parent context node called School under which I created the nonsingleton node ClassRoom. If I had directly placed the ClassRoom node under the root context, it would have become an independent node, and thus by default a singleton node!

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  1. Roy Cohen
    Dear Harsh,

    Thank you for your clear and simple explanation of such an important subject.
    I didn’t quite understood the section that deals with “Limit on the number of instances”.
    Since this is a critical issue, can you try and explain it to me in more simple words…?

    (0) 
    1. Harsh Chawla Post author
      Hi Roy,
          Thanks for your comment, really appreciate it. Now about the limit on the number of instances, let me give it another shot. Let’s take the same example of the School(Parent Node) and ClassRoom(Nonsingleton child node). Now by definition of a nonsingleton node, the number of “instances” of the ClassRoom node is equal to the number of “elements” of the parent node, i.e. the number of elements of the School node in this case. Therefore, if you have 5 elements of the School node are runtime, you cannot have more than 5 instances of the ClassRoom node. This is the limitation, I was trying to explain. In other words, the maximum number of instances of a nonsingleton node cannot exceed the cardinality of the parent node. Hope this clarifies my point. Do let me know, if you need any further clarification.
      Regards,
      Harsh
      (0) 
    2. Harsh Chawla Post author
      Hi Roy,
          Thanks for your comment, really appreciate it. Now about the limit on the number of instances, let me give it another shot. Let’s take the same example of the School(Parent Node) and ClassRoom(Nonsingleton child node). Now by definition of a nonsingleton node, the number of instances of the ClassRoom node is equal to the number of elements of the parent node, i.e. the number of elements of the School node in this case. Therefore, if you have 5 elements of the School node are runtime, you cannot have more than 5 instances of the ClassRoom node. This is the limitation, I was trying to explain. In other words, the maximum number of instances of a nonsingleton node cannot exceed the cardinality of the parent node. Hope this clarifies my point. Do let me know, if you need any further clarification.
      Regards,
      Harsh
      (0) 
    3. Harsh Chawla Post author
      Hi Roy,
          Thanks for your comment, really appreciate it. Now about the limit on the number of instances, let me give it another shot. Let’s take the same example of the School(Parent Node) and ClassRoom(Nonsingleton child node). Now by definition of a nonsingleton node, the number of instances of the ClassRoom node is equal to the number of elements of the parent node, i.e. the number of elements of the School node in this case. Therefore, if you have 5 elements of the School node are runtime, you cannot have more than 5 instances of the ClassRoom node. This is the limitation, I was trying to explain. In other words, the maximum number of instances of a nonsingleton node cannot exceed the cardinality of the parent node. Hope this clarifies my point. Do let me know, if you need any further clarification.
      Regards,
      Harsh
      (0) 

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